Star pupil at £13,000 a year private girls school dies after cocaine fuelled sex with a 19-year-old – The HabariTimes Online
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Star pupil at £13,000 a year private girls school dies after cocaine fuelled sex with a 19-year-old

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Star pupil at £13,000 a year private girls school dies after cocaine fuelled sex with a 19-year-old

A star pupil at a top private girls’ school died after having cocaine-fuelled sex at her parents’ home.

Poorvi Giri, 17, had achieved ten A* GCSEs at £13,000-a-year King Edward VI School in Birmingham.

The exceptional student, whose parents are both doctors, was planning to read physics at university.

She collapsed at the family’s £1million home and entered cardiac arrest after meeting a 19-year-old for sex during the summer holidays.

Exceptional student: Poorvi Giri with her parents Vibha and Sitaram, who are both doctors

She was taken to Good Hope Hospital where her father Dr Sitaram Giri works as a hip and knee surgeon.

Doctors found cocaine in her system, an inquest heard. Further tests revealed ‘heart impairment’ caused by her use of the drug, described by one doctor as the most severe changes he had seen in someone so young.

The teenager never regained consciousness after the incident on August 1, and was declared dead three weeks later on August 22.

Poorvi’s mother Dr Vibha Giri, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology, said: ‘Our whole family is heartbroken at the death of our brilliant and beautiful daughter.’

Poorvi’s mother Dr Vibha Giri, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology, said: ‘Our whole family is heartbroken at the death of our brilliant and beautiful daughter’(Dr Giri pictured attending Birmingham Coroners Court for the inquest into Poorvi)

Poorvi’s mother Dr Vibha Giri, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology, said: ‘Our whole family is heartbroken at the death of our brilliant and beautiful daughter’(Dr Giri pictured attending Birmingham Coroners Court for the inquest into Poorvi)

Poorvi’s mother Dr Vibha Giri, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology, said: ‘Our whole family is heartbroken at the death of our brilliant and beautiful daughter’(Dr Giri pictured attending Birmingham Coroners Court for the inquest into Poorvi)

Poorvi’s school is planning to pay tribute by placing a bench with a commemorative plaque overlooking the tennis courts – one of her ‘favourite places’.

Friends said the teenager had a history of drug use and ‘went off the rails’ before her GCSEs – but still managed to produce outstanding results.

On Instagram she used the nickname ‘Pocaine’ – a slang term for combining cocaine and pot, or marijuana – and shared provocative pictures, including one showing a white pill on her tongue.

A schoolfriend said: ‘She was always a bit of a wild child but she really went off the rails before her GCSEs. She would come into school drunk and stuff.

‘We were surprised the school let her back.

‘It was because her results were so good. That was the only reason she was let back in.’ The friend added: ‘No one really knows who the boy she was with on the day it happened was.’

Paramedics called to the sprawling four-bedroom detached property contacted police after finding Poorvi was bleeding. Detectives arrested the unnamed 19-year-old man on suspicion of wounding, but he was later released with no further action.

Birmingham Coroners’ Court heard paramedics tried to resuscitate Poorvi for over an hour to stem the bleeding before taking her to hospital at 4pm.

After surgery to repair the internal bleeding, tests revealed ‘heart impairment due to cocaine use’. The drug was found in two urine samples.

Poorvi Giri (centre) with her grandparents 

Poorvi Giri (centre) with her grandparents 

Poorvi's father Dr Sitaram Giri (pictured) attends Birmingham Coroners Court for the inquest

Poorvi's father Dr Sitaram Giri (pictured) attends Birmingham Coroners Court for the inquest

Poorvi’s father Dr Sitaram Giri (right) attends Birmingham Coroners Court for the inquest

In a statement read to the inquest, Dr John Elliott said the ‘significant’ changes to Poorvi’s heart ‘are the severest [I have] seen present in someone of that young age’.

He said the cause of death was caused by complications of cardiac arrest and ‘fluid overload’ in the blood.

The coroner read a statement from Dr Victoria Aziz, an expert in sexual offences, which said the internal injuries sustained by Poorvi were unlikely but possible in young women, and can be life threatening.

‘It’s impossible to say it was accidental, but it’s far more likely to have been accidental than intentional,’ she added.

Recording a verdict of ‘misadventure’, the coroner told Poorvi’s parents: ‘I hope you can remember happier times.’

Of claims that Poorvi had arrived at school drunk, her mother said: ‘We are very disappointed that someone who knew her should make such malicious and baseless allegations against her.

‘Our greatest wish is for her to be allowed to rest in peace. If she had ever arrived at school intoxicated through drink or drugs I am confident that her school would have contacted me immediately to come and collect her.’

King Edward VI headmistress Ann Clark said it was ‘inconceivable’ that Poorvi would have come in to school under the influence of drink or drugs, adding: ‘Teachers know students extremely well and would immediately spot a student acting out of character, enquiring after their welfare and alerting the pastoral team if they had any concerns.’ 

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